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From playwright David Martin and director Jacqs Graham comes this beautifully twisted tale of abuse and loss. With only a two people cast, Lucy Elzik and David Martin project themselves across the space, filling up the stage with their presence.

Elzik plays a vulnerable woman, desperately trying to grapple with her memories as she recounts her life to her therapist, played by Martin. Set in entirely in one day and within one space, the performers occasionally flit in and out of other persona’s as they attempt to weave a tale that is as complicated as it is dark.

It is a clever and captivating play that has many layers in which the audience is forced to unravel, one momentary look away and you could have lost a vital piece of information. Despite the dark subjects the play deals with, there as an occasional sense of relief with the quick witted and humours quips from Lucy Elzik’s character. She does not shy away from the spot light as she covers the stage, sifting through her past trauma. Elzik’s portrayal of an unstable woman who wrestles with guilt, shame and humiliation is beautiful. She taps in to every emotion on stage, leaving the audience mesmerized.

The stage is filled with different size trunks which are used for seats and which also store props. Elzik and Martin unload, reload, throw about, draw on and manoeuvre the props around the stage effortlessly as though it is all part of the act. Similarly, the use of music and sound effects employed are purposeful, they fill the silence and offer a relief from the ongoing dialogue between the two characters.

UnSpoken is a thought-provoking portrayal of a woman who has lost almost everything but is desperately still trying to deal with her struggles. Elzik is at the forefront of the drama, however Martin works alongside her, both of them working together to create a provocative, fascinating and beautiful tale.

 

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Issy Packer